More Web Fonts

The typography of this Web page is enabled by CSS3 Fonts@font-face rule and WOFF fonts from Monotype Imaging, Ascender Corporation, FontShop and Typotheque. The fonts and layout of this page will not look correct in browsers that do not support Web Open Font Format (WOFF) fonts. Click here for another Web Fonts demo

Space, time,

& type design

Fonts are designed by people. Fonts don’t grow on trees or spring out of the ground; they are designed – drawn or constructed – by individual type designers, who usually labor in obscurity but whose work we make use of every day.

Microsoft’s ubiquitous web font Verdana, for instance, was designed by Matthew Carter, probably the best known (least obscure) type designer working today. Carter has a background that stretches across nearly all the technologies of type design and production. As a young man in the 1950s, he was one of the last to learn the techniques of cutting metal type punches by hand. In later years, he developed typefaces for hot-metal composition, for photocomposition, and for several generations of digital typesetting, eventually drawing bitmaps and outlines for Verdana and other typefaces meant for reading onscreen.

Spacing
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Changing from one font to another makes a difference in the appearance of any text. Depending on the font, it can make a very great difference.
Changing from one font to another makes a difference in the appearance of any text. Depending on the font, it can make a very great difference.
Changing from one font to another makes a difference in the appearance of any text. Depending on the font, it can make a very great difference.
Changing from one font to another makes a difference in the appearance of any text. Depending on the font, it can make a very great difference.
But changing the font is only the beginning. You can make a paragraph easier or harder to read just by changing the amount of space between the lines. Sometimes adding a little extra space helps a lot.
But changing the font is only the beginning. You can make a paragraph easier or harder to read just by changing the amount of space between the lines. Sometimes adding a little extra space helps a lot.
But changing the font is only the beginning. You can make a paragraph easier or harder to read just by changing the amount of space between the lines. Sometimes adding a little extra space helps a lot.
But changing the font is only the beginning. You can make a paragraph easier or harder to read just by changing the amount of space between the lines. Sometimes adding a little extra space helps a lot.

Type design is a constant dialog between the constraints of technology and the needs of human reading. In the days of metal type, each character had to fit on the end of a piece of solid metal, which would be composed, locked in a forme, inked, and printed from. In these days of reading onscreen, where screen resolution is an issue, type designers take great pains to design typefaces that will look good and function well at many different sizes and resolutions, on many different kinds of display, in an almost infinite range of contexts. This is one reason why developing a usable text typeface is not a quick or easy job; it takes craft skill, technical knowledge, and hard work.

fonts used on this page: itc musclehead, handel gothic ots, syndor ots (from fonts.com web fonts – try it for free); ff unit slab web, ff meta web, ff prater script web, ff dax web, ff clifford eighteen web, ff tisa web, ff kievit web, ff milo serif web, ff din web, ff celeste small text web (from fsi fontshop international); verdana pro (from ascender corporation); & fedra sans screen (from typotheque).

Sample page built by Sylvain Galineau with the help of Simon Daniels, John Berry, and Mike Duggan for typography and content design.

We thank our font suppliers Monotype Imaging, Ascender Corporation, FontShop and Typotheque.